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CHIROPRACTIC DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL

THE NEUROLOGY OF CHIROPRACTIC

Returning in 2020 . Marriott Courtyard . Sydney . NSW

ONLY LIMITED SPACES LEFT
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CHIROPRACTIC DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL

THE NEUROLOGY OF CHIROPRACTIC

Returning in 2020 . Marriott Courtyard . Sydney . NSW

ONLY LIMITED SPACES LEFT
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CLINICAL TRAINING & COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

MODULE 1 - NEUROLOGY OF CHIROPRACTIC

The goal of Module 1 is to renew your clarity about what you do in everyday practice, no matter what technique you use or your specialisation. It is now well recognised that the effects of chiropractic go beyond the mechanical. Our neuroscience understanding is rapidly evolving, offering us many opportunities to describe the changes that we observe in our patients' nervous systems. This pursuit requires an intimate knowledge of the fundamental building blocks that we work with - mechanoreceptors and neural connections that are plastic and mouldable.

Every day we see spines that are in a state of dysfunction and pain, and our job is to attach recognised diagnoses to them. But do we ever stop to ask what has already failed in a patient's nervous system when they suffer a tissue injury - such as a disc lesion or facet synovitis? And what factors might then 'tip' their central nervous system further towards a state of chronic pain?

Ultimately, our neuromusculoskeletal systems are suffering as a direct result of our modern lifestyle. Movement patterns are less variable and more repetitive. Disused neural connections fade, while brain maps of joint motion shrink to the level of our movement poverty. Module 1 takes a close look at how these changes occur and what we can do to reverse them.
UNDERSTANDING NEUROLOGY
THE FOUNDATION OF CHIROPRACTIC
Our brains are constantly 'remoulded' by the way that we move our joints. Module 1 will explore how skilled passive movements of the human frame (adjustments) could help our patients to ‘re-learn’ how to use their joint system in a more healthy and complete way. We'll review the evidence to see how an adjustment might replace this missing sensory input and, in turn, influence many of the common structural pathologies that we diagnose in the spines of our patients.

In this Module we will cover:
  1. A NEUROLOGICAL MODEL FOR CHIROPRACTIC PRACTICE
As a clinician you operate based upon a conceptual model that you have in your mind. It determines the type of information that you take notice of, and that which you ignore. It guides your diagnostic decision-making as to what you think is ʻwrongʼ. It forms the basis for what you decide to do to the patient. How clear is your own clinical model? How do you decide where to apply physical forces to your patients? What major indicators do you rely upon?
  1. UNDERSTANDING NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL
We are accustomed to learning about motor control in a segmental way, but in this Module we are going to think about it differently. A better understanding of this functional layout can help to explain many of the observed benefits of spinal manipulation, as well as provide us with some very useful assessment tools for everyday practice.
  1. UNDERSTANDING SENSORIMOTOR CONTROL
It is important that you understand the neurological basis for orientation, postural stability and spinal alignment. You will appreciate the relationship between the reflex control of the spine and eyes for balance and postural stability, and how the cerebellum continuously ‘calibrates’ these reflex systems. You will also learn that the brain holds multiple spatial 'maps' that regulate and protect the body (the 'cortical body matrix') and how pain and altered movement leads to disorganisation of this central representation. Once the delicate interplay between brain and spine is lost, the default adaptive strategy tends to be one of increasing generalised stiffness. How might your adjustments help this?
  1. THE NEUROLOGY OF PAIN
Our patients may have various chronically painful structures within their framework including discs, joints, tendons, ligaments, muscles, fascia and nerves. But the experience of pain doesnʼt correlate with how much the parts are damaged.

The latest pain science tells us that all of these potentially painful structures are connected to a central nervous system that is constantly making decisions about how painful they should or shouldnʼt be. It is a CNS that may already have a genetic tendency to be hypersensitive to inputs from the frame; a CNS that remembers previous injuries and threats, imprints them in the limbic system, and factors them into future decision-making; itʼs a CNS that is constantly trying to predict the likelihood of injury to the mechanical parts, and then sets the tissue sensitivity to best match this danger level; a CNS that constantly selects certain movement behaviours over others, in order to minimise the chance of further injury.

All of this decision-making is based upon how well the brain 'understands' the moving parts – the central representation or mapping of every functional possibility and available movement option.

By the end of this topic, you should also appreciate that the words you use can be as effective as the treatment that you administer.
  1. NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF SPINAL MANIPULATION
Spinal manipulation is usually performed in less than 1/10th of a second. So how could this short-lasting mechanical stimulus change the behaviour of the nervous system in a way that outlasts the intervention itself? In this topic we shall explore the answer to this major question. We will look closely at the central role of the muscle spindle, and how it turns a rapid mechanical stretch into a neurological 'change agent' that reverberates up through the neuraxis. But do we truly alter the positional relationship of vertebrae? If not, what are we doing?
  1. THE PRACTICAL NEUROLOGICAL ASSESSMENT
From a chiropractic perspective, the neurological examination is more than the search for a neurological disease process (such as a space-occupying lesion or radiculopathy). Chiropractors must become highly skilled in assessing the neurological systems at a functional level. In this topic you will learn how to perform a comprehensive and logical neurological assessment - including both a standard neurological examination and an evaluation of sensorimotor control.
  1. APPLYING A NEUROLOGICAL MODEL IN CHIROPRACTIC PRACTICE
It is vital that your decision-making is based upon a valid and cohesive model. Chiropractors must show themselves to be agile clinicians that readily accommodate new information and constantly refine their skills of assessment and therapeutic goal-setting. The chiropractor is a neuromusculoskeletal diagnostician first, and wellness advocate second. In this topic we will apply the key concepts of neuromusculoskeletal diagnosis and neuroscience that we covered earlier to a series of challenging clinical cases.
By the end of the program your appreciation of daily practice will be very different. You will leave with a greater understanding of your role as a chiropractor. You will appreciate how to use physical forces to change neurological function, and with it, human performance. You'll see how the delivery of targeted mechanical forces to the spinal joint system could influence spinal stability, posture, balance, autonomic function, pain perception, visual acuity and even cognition. We will assemble all of this into a framework for applying neuroscience in a meaningful way to daily practice. So take the next step with your professional develop and enrol in Module 1 now.
CPD POINTS AWARDED
This program has been submitted for categorisation by CAA National for 13.5 formal learning hours (FLA).

It has also been recognised by the Academy of Chiropractic Orthopedists (ACO) for 13.5 hours of board certification-level education.
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MODULE DETAILS
EVENT LOCATION

Courtyard by Marriott North Ryde
7-11 Talavera Rd
Macquarie Park NSW

Tel: (02) 9491 9500

DATES & SESSION TIMES

Returning in 2020

Saturday: 9 am - 5.00 pm
Sunday: 8 am - 3.00 pm

COURSE FEES

Chiropractors:
AUD $880 Early Bird
AUD $990 Full Fee

Students:
AUD $550 Early Bird
AUD $660 Full Fee

1st Year Grad:
AUD $770 Early Bird
AUD $880 Full Fee

*Early Bird

ONLY LIMITED SPACES LEFT
iPad Targeted Content
MODULE DETAILS
EVENT LOCATION

Courtyard by Marriott North Ryde
7-11 Talavera Rd
Macquarie Park NSW

Tel: (02) 9491 9500

DATES & SESSION TIMES

Returning in 2020

Saturday: 9 am - 5.00 pm
Sunday: 8 am - 3.00 pm

COURSE FEES

Chiropractors:
AUD $880 Early Bird
AUD $990 Full Fee

Students:
AUD $550 Early Bird
AUD $660 Full Fee

1st Year Grad:
AUD $770 Early Bird
AUD $880 Full Fee

*Early Bird

Android Targeted Content
MODULE DETAILS
EVENT LOCATION

Courtyard by Marriott North Ryde
7-11 Talavera Rd
Macquarie Park NSW

Tel: (02) 9491 9500

DATES & SESSION TIMES

Returning in 2020

Saturday: 9 am - 5.00 pm
Sunday: 8 am - 3.00 pm

COURSE FEES

Chiropractors:
AUD $880 Early Bird
AUD $990 Full Fee

Students:
AUD $550 Early Bird
AUD $660 Full Fee

1st Year Grad:
AUD $770 Early Bird
AUD $880 Full Fee

*Early Bird

ONLY LIMITED SPACES LEFT
Blackberry Targeted Content
Desktop and all none targeted content
MODULE DETAILS
EVENT LOCATION

Courtyard by Marriott North Ryde
7-11 Talavera Rd
Macquarie Park NSW

Tel: (02) 9491 9500

DATES & SESSION TIMES

Returning in 2020

Saturday: 9 am - 5.00 pm
Sunday: 8 am - 3.00 pm

COURSE FEES

Chiropractors:
AUD $880 Early Bird
AUD $990 Full Fee

Students:
AUD $550 Early Bird
AUD $660 Full Fee

1st Year Grad:
AUD $770 Early Bird
AUD $880 Full Fee

*Early Bird

RETURNING IN 2020
If you have any questions then please contact us. To avoid disappointment we advise that you register as soon as registrations open in 2020, as this Module will sell out.
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Thank you for contacting Chiropractic Development International. Our Enrolments Manager Ms Jeannie Smith will get back to you as soon as possible.

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The CDI Team

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